Still places available at my WSET tasting

Next week I’m doing another Champagne tasting at the London HQ of the Wine & Spirt Education Trust (WSET). This time, with purchases for Christmas and the New Year partly in mind, I’m concentrating on pointing people in the direction of some great champagnes from slightly less known producers, which match or better some of the wines made by the big names. And partly as a result of being less well known, your money goes a lot further in terms of getting more exciting wine.

There are eight different producers involved, four growers and four co-operatives. We start with a fine pair of contrasting growers’ champagnes. Laherte Frères, who are located in the Premier Cru village of Chavot, make some lovely wines, many based on Pinot Meunier as Brut Ultradition, our first wine in the line-up is. Stylistically there’s quite a contrast with the Pierre Gimonnet Blanc de Blancs Premier Cru. Gimonnet, one of the first growers I ever met in Champagne over two decades ago, has a fantastic holding of top Côte des Blancs vineyards including Cuis, known for its steely longevity, where this family operation is based.

Pierre Paillard’s Grand Cru (Bouzy) ‘Les Parcelles’ Extra Brut

For the second pair we move more into Pinot Noir territory and these are sourced from two adjacent, Montagne de Reims grand cru villages, Bouzy and Ambonnay. Pierre Paillard only has vineyards in Bouzy, but as with most small producers, these are broken up into lots of tiny parcels spread all over the whole Bouzy cru which is roughly 365 hectares in size. This particular wine is a 60/40 Pinot/Chardonnay blend from 22 such plots Paillard owns.

Then we move to the Grand Cru of Ambonnay where Benoît Marguet is based – he’s just next door to Krug, who he sell grapes to incidentally

Benoît Marguet taking barrel samples

— for the super rosé he makes for Berry’s which is sold under their award-winning Berry’s Own Label range. It’s made from a blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, using the saignée method where colour is literally bled off the skins of the black Pinot grapes.

In Champagne, as in other parts of France say like Chablis, the co-operatives make some of the best wines in the region. While some are sold under their own brands, as three of the wines in my tasting are, they are also the most important suppliers of Own Label champagne to the UK’s major supermarkets and occasionally gems crop up, particularly among the vintage wines.

In this tasting we are including four vintage champagnes, from a quartet of Champagne’s top co-ops, two from the fine 2008 harvest which even nearly a decade on, still shows a trademark vibrant acidity. One a Chardonnay/Pinot Noir blend, the other pure Chardonnay. Then we pair the top quality 2012 vintage (Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs), which may in time be judged as at least the equal of 2002, with a lovely mature 2005 which is at its peak. Hopefully a great note to finish on.

There are still some places left and the cost is just £45 a ticket/person. The tasting is on Tuesday 5 December and starts at 6:30pm, finishing between 8 and 8.30pm. Here’s a link to the WSET website you can use to sign up: http://bit.ly/2m1Q9hi

The eight champagnes in the tasting are:
Laherte Frères Brut Ultradition NV (Chavot) Stockist: The Wine Society, £25.
Gimonnet Blanc de Blancs Premier Cru (Cuis) Brut NV, Oddbins £32 (75cl), £70 a magnum; The Wine Society £25, also available in Growers’ wine case (1×6 75cl) code:  LC17407 at £149, down from £177, a saving of £28, equivalent to £24.83 a bottle.
Pierre Paillard Grand Cru (Bouzy) ‘Les Parcelles’ Extra Brut NV, The Wine Society £27 a bottle, £162 a six-bottle case (also available in Growers’ wine case code:  LC17407 see above).
Berry Bros. & Rudd Rosé by Marguet, Grand Cru (Ambonnay), BBR.com £36 a bottle, £194.40 a six-bottle case, a saving of £21.60).
Devaux
Brut Vintage 2008, Hedonism Wines £56.80 a bottle.
Nicolas Feuillatte Blanc de Blancs Vintage 2008, Waitrose £28.99 a bottle.   
De St Gall
 Grand Cru (Avize) Brut Vintage 2012*, M&S £35 a bottle (*may still be the previous very good 2009 vintage).
Waitrose Brut Vintage 2005, Waitrose £24.99 a bottle.

 

Gosset Celebris tasting: 1988 to 2004

Gosset glass launch pic BOver the years I’ve come to like the champagnes made by Gosset more and more. As Didier Gimonnet said to me on a recent visit to Cuis, producers should be judged on the quality of their whole range, not merely on one super-charged cuvée that they produce in minute quantities, as he suggested some commentators are apt to do. But as with the excellent Gimonnet wines, I’d be very happy drinking any Gosset champagnes, Continue reading “Gosset Celebris tasting: 1988 to 2004”

Fifteen prestige cuvées from 2002

The prospect of tasting 15 prestige cuvée champagnes in one sitting later this week is a mouth-watering one.  Especially as they are all from the celebrated 2002 vintage, which will probably, with a little competition from 2008 & ’09, go down as the finest vintage of the past decade. But it’s interesting to speculate — before I have seen the actual list — who will be included in the line-up?

I imagine Dom Pérignon, Cristal and Krug will be there, the last named only released to a rapturous welcome early this year, while Cristal will potentially boast considerable bottle age, given it was first made available over seven years ago. I guess Dom Ruinart, fabulously rich and powerful in 2002 and Clicquot’s La Grande Dame will complete the Moët-Hennessy quartet in the line-up.

Pol Roger Sir Winston Churchill and Salon are two further acclaimed ‘02 releases, and I’m pretty sure Taittinger’s Comte de Champagne will feature (see my piece on the recent Finest Bubble vertical tasting of Comte 1996-2006 which included the 2002). To these eight we can probably add Continue reading “Fifteen prestige cuvées from 2002”

Bollinger shows how it restores old bottles in larger formats

Before last month’s historic tasting of old vintages of Bollinger dating back to 1830, the year after the house was founded, on our tour of the cellars we saw the restoration work the winemaking team does by hand, using ancient methods.

In this short video we can hear Bollinger assistant winemaker Denis Bunner describing how the winemaking team, working in the cellars, are restoring Jeroboams of Bollinger ‘RD’ 2000. Disgorging the wines by hand (à la volée), tasting them all and then topping them up, before giving them their final cork, all of which is done by hand, using traditional skills.

Comte de Champagne vertical tasting 2006-1996

Comte line up 4 VerticalHistorically Champagne has not been seen as a wine appropriate for investment purposes, certainly not in the same way as say red Bordeaux. The three most commonly traded prestige cuvées have in the past been Dom Pérignon, Krug and Louis Roederer’s Cristal. Vintage Krug and Cristal, both produced in far smaller volumes than Dom Pérignon, tend to have the higher values, though which comes out on top depends on the Continue reading “Comte de Champagne vertical tasting 2006-1996”

Veuve Clicquot launches ’08 vintage on the Côte de Nuits

Started last week in Burgundy at Clos des Lambrays in Morey-Saint-Denis c/o Veuve Clicquot, for the launch of their 2008 Vintage Réserve. Clicquot never likes to do anything by halves, witness the event they organised in June 2014 around burying 300 bottles and 50 magnums on the Baltic seabed to test how champagne ages there;
http://www.decanter.com/news/wine-news/587201/veuve-clicquot-to-age-champagne-in-baltic-sea#XfUWqDDh2FG7AhpI.99

Continue reading “Veuve Clicquot launches ’08 vintage on the Côte de Nuits”

Krug launches 2002 vintage & changes Grand Cuvée label (slightly)

Bjoern Weissgerber, group executive chef at Zuma restaurants was kind enough to take this picture of Eric Lebel with me at the 2002 launch

Yesterday I had the chance to try the newly released Krug 2002 vintage, along with a group of top sommeliers and chefs, many of whom are Krug ambassadors. One of the last, if not the last, major house to put its ’02 offering on the market, the expectations were high. The wine isn’t a disappointment. Subtle, gentle, harmonious, it has that indefinable quality, that extra dimension, lift and intensity that only the top vintages in Champagne offer with a silky texture and long finish. To put the new wine in context after a mandatory glass of Grande Cuvée, the current release based Continue reading “Krug launches 2002 vintage & changes Grand Cuvée label (slightly)”