Dom Pérignon launches 2002 P2

Dom Pérignon 2002 P2 and the original release

Bruno Paillard, who has long championed the use of disgorgement dates on his own champagnes, and those of the brands in the wider BCC group, has an anecdote he is fond of bringing up to emphasize the importance of post-disgorgement ageing. He feels the more venerable the wine, the longer it needs to recover from the shock of disgorgement. In much the same way as an older person is likely to take longer to recover from a serious operation than a younger one. It makes sense. Champagne is unlikely to perform at its best immediately, post l’Opération — as the cellar hands refer to the process of dégorgement.

Somewhat mischievously, Paillard likes to reference an annual consumer tasting in Paris of the big-name prestige cuvées, where he claims that historically two wines in particular were largely avoided by attendees. The two wines in question were Dom Pérignon Oenothéque, as it was then called and Bollinger RD. The implication being that both these ‘recently disgorged’ wines were still suffering from the shock of disgorgement and didn’t show at all well at that point in their evolution.

Dom Pérignon Chef de Cave Vincent Chaperon

Over the years I have not been a fan of the Dom Pérignon Oenothéque wines when they were first released, finding them generally rather harsh and unfriendly. And, when the opportunity occasionally came up to taste them against the original release of the same wine, always preferring that. At one such tasting given for MWs a few years back by Benoït Gouez, then working with Richard Geoffroy before he took over as Chef de cave at Moët, I was one of the very few people in the room voting that way on a show of hands.

It is to their credit that the team under Geoffroy, now led by Vincent Chaperon, recognised this problem with the second release of Dom Pérignon, and they have gradually extended the length of time the wine gets on the cork, post-disgorgement. With the 2002 Dom Pérignon second plenitude release, now simply called P2, tasted a few hours ago today, this post disgorgement rest has now been extended to two years.

While the wine making has generally evolved so that the first releases of DP in the ‘noughties’ have been noticeably more user friendly — softer and more generous — this is the first time I’ve really noticed the difference this extra time makes. When comparing the new 2002 P2 that has had some 15 years lees ageing, plus two years on the final cork, with the original 2002 release that has about a decade of post disgorgement ageing, the step-up intensity, vibrancy and energy shown by the P2 is clear. Chaperon’s assertion that this is a wine still on an upward curve with a long future ahead of it, seems totally reasonable too.

Canard-Duchêne celebrates 150th anniversary and launches new prestige Cuvée V

Alain Thiénot raises a glass of Cuvée Léonie to 15 years of work at Canard-Duchêne

Last month Canard-Duchêne hosted guests from around the world in Ludes to celebrate the house’s 150th anniversary. It has been 15 years since Alain Thiénot bought the house from LVMH, Continue reading “Canard-Duchêne celebrates 150th anniversary and launches new prestige Cuvée V”

Message in a bottle

One of the main reasons that champagne houses covet working with the leading airlines is they like the exposure for their brands. They want to be seen as the preferred pour in the first or business class cabin. Partly because this is an affluent audience that’s difficult to reach, they will even agree relatively unprofitable deals to get the listing, though of course they are at pains to deny this.

But they know there is a large potential downside to this exposure. Will the cabin staff pour the champagne in front of the customer, thus showing Continue reading “Message in a bottle”

Piper’s ‘new wine’ another Essentiel step to restore image

It’s very hard for a champagne brand to get rid of a negative image. Years of ownership by the Rémy-Cointreau drinks group (they also used to have Krug in their grasp), which better understands the spirits market, did a good deal of harm to Piper-Heidsieck’s reputation, something which in Champagne essentially rests on the quality of your mainstream non-vintage cuvée, likely to account for more than 80% of your sales.

Purchased by the French luxury goods group Entreprise Patrimoniale d’Investissements (EPI) from Rémy-Cointreau in June 2011, along with sister brand Charles Heidsieck, fundamental changes were made to the way the business is run. Firstly, EPI owner Christopher Descours installed Continue reading “Piper’s ‘new wine’ another Essentiel step to restore image”